Endometriosis Symptoms Often Go Unrecognized, Nationwide Survey Finds


Endometriosis Symptoms Often Go Unrecognized, Nationwide Survey Finds

The findings indicated that almost half (42%) of the women surveyed did not know that painful intercourse could be a sign of endometriosis. Importantly, 20% of healthcare professionals rarely or never asked their patients about painful intercourse.

Less than a third of women recognize all the pain-associated symptoms of endometriosis, according to a nationwide survey conducted in the U.S. Importantly, two-third of the women surveyed knew someone who had endometriosis but rarely discussed pelvic pain with them.

The survey was called “What Do You Know About Endometriosis?” and was conducted online between December 2016 and February 2017. It was run by HealthyWomen, an independent women’s health organization and sponsored by the pharmaceutical company Abbvie.

“The survey findings indicate a lack of knowledge and conversation about endometriosis symptoms among women,” said Beth Battaglino, the CEO of HealthyWomen in a press release.“Without informed communication of endometriosis symptoms, it can take longer for women to receive a diagnosis. Both patients and healthcare professionals would benefit from further education to increase awareness of symptoms so women can take action when they present.”

The participants included 1,211 adult women and 352 healthcare professionals.

The findings indicated that almost half (42%) of the women surveyed did not know that painful intercourse could be a sign of endometriosis. Importantly, 20% of healthcare professionals rarely or never asked their patients about painful intercourse.

A total of 219 women out of the 1,211 surveyed (18%) indicated that they had endometriosis. Almost half of these women (42%) indicated that they were told by their doctors that their pain was “just part of being a woman”.

Eighty-six percent of women with endometriosis said that their pain was interfering with their daily lives in one way or another. However only around a third (34%) of healthcare professionals reported asking their patients at every visit whether their pelvic pain interfered with their daily lives.

The results clearly indicate that more awareness and education is needed in the field of endometriosis. Based on these results and as part of a campaign called “Get in the Know about ME in EndoMEtriosis”, HealthyWomen launched an information pack on endometriosis.

It is hoped that this resource will empower women with endometriosis and improve the diagnosis and outcome of the condition.


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